Jacket Image



India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking

Anand Giridharadas

List price £9.99 Add to basket
Product Details
Format:
Paperback
ISBN:
9781250001726
Published:
01 Feb 2012
Publisher:
Macmillan
Dimensions:
288 pages - 140 x 210mm

Anand Giridharadas sensed something was afoot as his plane from America prepared to land in Bombay. An elderly passenger looked at him and said, 'We're all trying to go that way,' pointing to the rear. 'You, you're going this way?' Giridharadas was returning to the land of his ancestors, amid an unlikely economic boom. But he was interested less in its gold rush than in its cultural upheaval, as a new generation has sought to reconcile old traditions and customs with new ambitions and dreams. In "India Calling", Giridharadas brings to life the people and the dilemmas of India today, through the prism of his emigre family history and his childhood memories of India. He introduces us to entrepreneurs, radicals, industrialists, and religious seekers, but, most of all, to Indian families. He shows how parents and children, husbands and wives, cousins and siblings are reinventing relationships, bending the meaning of Indianness, and enduring the pangs of the old birthing the new. Through their stories, and his own, he paints an intimate portrait of a country becoming modern while striving to remain itself.

India Calling 9780805091779 (hardcover)
Anand Giridharadas writes the "Currents" column for the "International Herald Tribune" and "The New York Times" online. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, and a graduate of the University of Michigan, he worked in Bombay as a management consultant until 2005, when he began reporting from that city for the "Herald Tribune" and the "Times." He now lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Brings to life the people and the dilemmas of India today, through the prism of the author's emigre family history and his childhood memories of India. In this book, he introduces us to entrepreneurs, radicals, industrialists, and religious seekers, but, most of all, to Indian families.

You might also be interested in..

« Back